20 thoughts on “120w – 300w Solar Panels to Charge Electric bikes

  • May 2, 2017 at 7:23 am
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    I want to buy solar panels to charge or possibly direct drive a 48volt 1000w system with a 12ah battery. Please contact me!

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  • May 2, 2017 at 7:23 am
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    Any folding 50+ watt solar panel hooked to an MPPT solar charger will work. I have found more than a few folding panels on amazon that have an 18v unloaded output, probably around 12-14v with a load under near perfect conditions. You can DIY a system that would be similar these to at a quarter of the price. I would honestly just get two batteries. For the price, charge time, weight, and longevity solar is just not there yet to have a viable and efficient portable setup. Now I do believe solar on the house or rv is the best way to go don't get me wrong. These are just ridonculously overpriced systems.

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  • May 2, 2017 at 7:23 am
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    these don't charge the motors. its all about the battery packs used. i have a 3,000 watt bike. but the battery i have is super-beefy 26 Ah

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  • May 2, 2017 at 7:23 am
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    I have the 300 watt panels that I got from these guys. I also have the 52Volt 15AH battery from them. The stuff is very cool but the specs are off. I live in Sacramento and today I did a full charge on the battery from dead to full. It took 3 hours 40 minutes. The solar charge converter can run almost 96% efficient. Even though the specs listed in the video are off, the products they sell are reliable and great.

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  • May 2, 2017 at 7:23 am
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    14,000 miles on my latest ebike in 2 years time. I would actually LOVE a 300 watt panel setup for 12s. But the price is just way too high. I'm planning a 7,000 + mile trip and that would allow me to have a lot less stress on the long stretches without many populated areas.

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  • May 2, 2017 at 7:23 am
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    Your math is way off. How can a 120W solar panel charge a 1000Wh system in 3.5 hours? Take 120W x 3.5 and you only get 420Wh.
    To charge a 1000Wh battery bank (1KWh), you need 1000/120=8.33 hours or 8 hours 20 minutes. And that assuming you get 100% efficiency out of everything in your system including the solar panel, the charge controller, the wirings, the sun's position in the sky, and the battery bank. In reality, you're lucky if you can get 70% out of the whole system. That means most of the time you don't. The temperature of the panel, the angle of the panel relative to the sun, the season (summer or winter), shading (clouds), the charge controller efficiency, the battery efficiency, the power loss in wirings… and much more. So if you account everything together, 8 hours 20 minutes will turn into 15 hours easily.

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  • May 2, 2017 at 7:23 am
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    why would you possibly use this? Just use a re-chargable/ self charging bike…powered by peddling the bike!

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  • May 2, 2017 at 7:23 am
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    Awesome, I was thinking of this long ago when I first seen the thin flexible lightweight solar panels. Fold the solar panel up and put it in your backpack with your laptop. Have the panels unfold and attach to your bike for charging. For long trips have a small light weight pull behind cart hooked to the bike that holds your stuff and has a decent size light weight solar panel wing on top to charge the bike batteries as you ride and extend the range. At first I wanted a 2 stroke engine on a full suspension mountain bike, but decided electric is way better for not being hassled by the cops.

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  • May 2, 2017 at 7:23 am
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    Can these be used while you´re pedalling in any way, or it would require a second battery?

    Cheers.

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  • May 2, 2017 at 7:23 am
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    California just passed a Solar Payment Policy that requires PG&E to pay solar panel owners who feed surplus onto the grid, $0.49 kwh.   AB 327.  The PUC will remodel it in 2015 to make it work for all solar home owners.

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  • May 2, 2017 at 7:23 am
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    A solar powered RV or house will easily supply enough sol energy to charge a bike.
    My goal is to make $300. a month off the grid, from a solar powered home.
    Such homes are easy to build, or remodel, just at 5 solar panels at $2,000.
    KB homes sells them in Lancaster, Ca.,
    See on Youtube: paul8kangas

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  • May 2, 2017 at 7:23 am
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    I've a 48V10Ah Li-Ion battery from BMS Battery that I'm running with a GNG mid drive mounted on a Marin full suspension mountain bike. I must add I love the battery bag purchase from you guys. Please give a ball park fig on the solar panel cost all 3 configs.

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